Advocating for Farm and Food Policy

The Davis Food Co-op is more than a grocery store, it is a collective of people who have the power to shape local, national, and global food systems.

Right now in the United States, we find ourselves at a pivotal moment in the journey to redefine our food system. The future of our food is being decided by lawmakers right now.

The best part? You have the power to voice your opinion to help shape it.

The Farm Bill, a crucial piece of legislation that can set the tone for our nation’s food and agriculture policy, is currently under review. Our elected officials are considering which proposals will be included in this year’s bill – decisions that will impact our food system for the next five years. We believe it’s time for a more equitable food system that puts farmworkers first and is more just, resilient, and regenerative, and that’s where you come in. By familiarizing yourself with the Bill and Acts that accompany it, you can put yourself in a position to advocate for that which you feel most strongly about.

A recent blog from National Co+op Grocers (NCG) provides you with a detailed list of current (and growing) proposed bills, outlining what they aim to achieve and who supports them. Whether it’s a bill that champions small-scale farmers or one that incentivizes organic farming, you can find the ones that you resonate with and lend them your support.

As part of NCG, we strive to advocate for our communities’ shared priorities for the food system. Together, we can make our voices heard and play a role in shaping a sustainable and equitable food landscape. Want to get involved but not sure where to start? No worries, the blog post above has you covered with easy instructions on how to contact Congress, whether you prefer to make a phone call or write an email. You’ll also find some tips to help you articulate your support.

The changes we want to see in the world often start from the grassroots. By raising our voices in numbers to our elected officials, we can influence policies that impact our food, our farmers, and ultimately, our communities. Let’s work together to create the food system we all deserve. Let’s act now, the food future depends on it!

More >>

Plastic Free July Self Care DIY Recipes

We believe that taking care of yourself and the planet can go hand in hand. Below are five easy, zero waste self-care recipes that can be easily added to your daily routine.

Lotion Bars

Ingredients:
• 4 tbsp organic cocoa butter
• 2 tbsp pure refined organic shea butter
• 1 and a half tsp safflower oil
• 1 ½ tbsp tapioca starch
• 5-15 drops of essential oil(s) of your choice

Instructions:
1. Melt the cocoa butter and shea butter on low heat.
2. Then, add the safflower oil and the tapioca starch, and mix well.
3. Once the mixture cools down, add your preferred essential oil. (To cool it down faster, you can transfer it to another container or add it to the fridge for 5 minutes)
4. Next, pour the mixture into a silicone mold, or if you don’t have it, you can use metal tins.**
5. Put in the freezer for an hour and a half (or a bit longer, if you put it in the fridge), and then take out of the silicone mold/tins.

Notes
• ** Make sure to line the tins with paper, so you can easily take the lotion bars out, once they get solid.
• It’s best to store it in a tin, in the fridge.
• This recipe makes 2 medium bars or 3 smaller. Adjust recipe as needed.

Caffeine Eye Serum

Ingredients:
• 1/4 cup ground organic coffee
• 1/3 cup sweet almond oil
• 2 Tbsp castor oil
• dropper bottle
• cheesecloth or nut milk bag

Instructions:
1. Combine the sweet almond oil and the coffee in a glass jar.
2. Cover with a lid and let sit on the counter for a week to infuse.
3. Using your cheesecloth or nut milk bag (that’s what I used), strain the infused oil into a bowl, you might have some small coffee residue that gets through and that’s just fine.
4. Add the castor oil to the bowl and stir to combine.
5. Use a funnel to pour the oil into your dropper or roller ball bottle.

Notes:
If you use a roller ball, store it in the fridge so the roller ball gets cold and then use it as needed for puffiness — the cold ball will increase effects! Perfect to use first thing in the morning!

Rose Water Toner

Ingredients:
• Organic rose petals (4 stems total)

• 1.5 liters of distilled water

Instructions:
1. Remove petals from stems and run them under lukewarm water to remove any leftover residue.

2. Add petals to a large pot and top with enough distilled water to just cover (no more or you’ll dilute your rosewater).
3. Over medium-low heat, bring the water to a simmer and cover.
4. Let simmer for 20-30 minutes or until petals have lost their color.
5. Strain the mixture into a large bowl to separate the petals from the water.
6. Discard petals and pour water in a clean glass jar to store.
7. Add rose water to a spray bottle and spray mist directly onto face throughout the day or use a reusable cotton round to remove dirt and other residue.

Facial Cleanser

Ingredients
• 2 Tbsp Fractionated Coconut Oil
• 1 Tsp Dr Bronner’s Castile Soap – Unscented Baby
• Few Drops of Vitamin E Oil (optional)
• 1/3 Cup Distilled Water
• Reusable Cotton Rounds
• Small Glass Jar (I like a wide-mouth pint-sized mason jar!)

Instructions:
Add ingredients in glass jar and Shake.
Boom, done! Shake jar right before each use.

Notes
• Some folks find that coconut oil can clog their pores, so feel free to swap that out with jojoba oil.
• I prefer to use rose scented Dr. Bronner’s castile soap. Rose is gentle and hydrating for the skin and it smells delicious!
• Keep your reusable cotton rounds in the container so they are ready to go or simply dunk one when you are ready to use the cleanser.
• You can also add a few of your favorite essential oil drops. Lavender, rose, jasmine, and/or chamomile are great for sensitive skin.

Deodorant

Ingredients
• 2 1/2 tbsp unrefined coconut oil
• 2 1/2 tbsp unrefined shea butter
• 1/4 cup arrowroot starch/flour
• 1 1/2 tbsp baking soda
• 10 drops lavender essential oil
• 2 drop tea tree essential oil (optional)*

Instructions
1. Place coconut oil and shea butter in a glass bowl or jar and place the bowl/jar inside a medium sauce pan.
2. Add water to the saucepan (enough to surround bowl/jar but not to overflow it) and bring to a boil.
3. As water is heating up, stir coconut oil and shea butter and continue to do so until it melts.
4. Once melted, add in arrowroot starch, baking soda and essential oils.
5. Place in a small glass jar (or pour into empty deodorant stick(s)) and allow to cool at room temp or in fridge until it’s reached a solid state.
6. Cover with lid until use.
7. Spoon out a pea-sized amount with a wooden scoop or with fingers and rub between fingers before applying directly to underarms.

Note
If this is your first time around using natural deodorant, your armpits may require an adjustment period while making the switch. Start by using this DIY Natural Deodorant 1-2 days a week and slowly increase.

Find all of these ingredients at the Davis Food Co-op!

More >>

EWG’s 2023 Dirty Dozen & Clean 15 List

Environmental Working Group (EWG) recently released their 2023 Dirty Dozen and Clean 15 list. EWG is a non-profit organization that specializes in research and advocacy in the areas of agricultural subsidies, toxic chemicals, drinking water pollutants, and corporate accountability.

Since 2004, EWG has released a Dirty Dozen and Clean 15 list of the most and least pesticide-contaminated non-organic fresh fruits and vegetables, respectively, based on the latest tests by the Department of Agriculture and the Food and Drug Administration.

Pesticides are toxic by design

Although they’re intended to kill pests such as fungi, insects, and plants, many pesticides are also linked to serious human health issues, including hormone disruption, brain and nervous system toxicity, and cancer.

 

Many pesticides are still legal for use in the U.S. but have been banned in the EU because of the science showing threats to human health and wildlife. Four toxic neonicotinoids – imidacloprid, thiamethoxam, clothianidin and dinotefuran – remain legal for use here, even though the EPA has acknowledged their danger to insects like honeybees.

 

For their 2023 Shopper’s Guide to Pesticides in Produce, the EWG used data that tested over 46,569 samples of 46 fruits and vegetables, covering 251 different pesticides.

The goal of these lists is to educate consumers so they can make the best decisions for their families while navigating the produce sections of their grocery stores.

Dirty Dozen List

These conventional fruits and vegetables were tested and found high traces of pesticides. It is recommended to get these fruits and veggies organic, whenever possible.

1. Strawberries

2. Spinach

3. Kale, Collards, & Mustard Greens

4. Peaches

5. Pears

6. Nectarines

7. Apples

8. Grapes

9.Bell/Hot Peppers

10. Cherries

11. Blueberries

12. Green Beans

Clean 15

These conventional fruits and vegetables were tested and this year, almost 65% of Clean Fifteen samples had no detectable pesticide residues. If purchasing organic produce is not an option, these are the safest recommended conventional produce.

1. Avocados

2. Sweet Corn

3. Pineapple

4. Onions

5. Papayas

6. Sweet Peas (frozen)

7. Asparagus

8. Honeydew Melons

9. Kiwi

10. Cabbage

11. Mushrooms

12.Mangoes

13. Sweet Potatoes

14. Watermelon

15. Carrots

Let’s be clear though..

Organic foods may still have small amounts of chemical residue, mainly due to contamination from nearby conventional farms, as well as having trace amounts of organic pesticides. Most organic pesticides are not synthetic and are derived from natural sources, such as minerals, plants, and bacteria. One of the best ways to know exactly how the produce you are consuming is grown, is to do some research on the farm which the produce is coming from. Or, if it is a local farm, you might have the opportunity to talk to the farmers directly and be told exactly what their farming practices are.

Below are two natural fruit and veggie washes that you can use on your organic and/or conventional produce.

Fruit and Veggie Wash

What You’ll Need

  • Spray Bottle
  • Measuring cups and spoons
  • Colander
  • 1 Cup White Vinegar
  • 4 Cups of Water
  • 1 Tbsp of Lemon Juice
  • Gentle Scrub Brush
  • Paper Towels


Instructions
1. Make your solution: To clean most fruits and vegetables, mix a solution of the cup vinegar and water inside your spray bottle, then add a tablespoon of lemon juice. Shake well to combine.
2. Place your fruit or vegetable in a colander in the sink. Spray it liberally with the mixture, then let it sit for two to five minutes.
3. Rinse off the mixture thoroughly with cool water, using a vegetable scrub brush on thicker-skinned produce.
4. Pat dry with paper towels.

Veggie Wash for Leafy Greens*

What You’ll Need

  • Glass or metal Bowl
  • Measuring cups and spoons
  • 1 cup White Vinegar
  • 4 Cups of Water
  • 1 tbsp Salt
  • colander or salad spinner
  • Paper Towels


Instructions
1. Make your solution: Fill the bowl with the solution of vinegar and water, then add the salt.
2. Let the greens sit in the solution for two to five minutes, then remove.
3. Rinse off the mixture thoroughly with cold water either in a colander or the basket of a salad spinner.
4. Dry the greens with paper towels or give them in a run through a salad spinner.

* It’s recommended to do this right before you eat the greens, since any excess moisture can lead to decay in the fridge.

The Dfc PRoduce Department

At the Davis Food Co-op, you can be assured that the produce you purchase is either Certified Organic or Certified Naturally Grown*. We do not carry conventional produce, as we believe in supporting sustainable farming practices that prioritize the health of our planet and its inhabitants.

*Certified Naturally Grown is a US-based farm assurance program certifying produce, livestock, and apiaries for organic producers who sell locally and directly to their customers. CNG farmers must commit to not using synthetic herbicides, pesticides, fertilizers, antibiotics, hormones, or genetically modified organisms.

All of our local farms are held to the same standards, and the Produce Department takes the time to visit them in person to witness their sustainable practices in action. By doing so, our Produce Department is able to develop a deep understanding of the produce we sell and answer any questions our customers may have to the best of their abilities.

We believe in providing high-quality, responsibly sourced produce to our community, and we take pride in supporting local farms and promoting sustainable agriculture.

More >>

Recognizing World Water Day

Did you Know that March 22nd is

World Water Day?

 

Nearly 60% of our bodies and around 70% of our planet are water. As a necessity for life on our planet, it should go without saying that water is pretty important. And yet, many of us are unaware of the fragility of our water systems and some of the global issues surrounding water, and access to it.

World Water Day is an annual event held on March 22nd that raises awareness about the importance of freshwater and the need to manage it sustainably. The event was established by the United Nations in 1993 and has been recognized every year since. Each year a theme is selected as an area of focus to bring attention to a particular issue in the world of water. The theme for World Water Day in 2023 is to strive towards achieving the UN’s Sustainable Development Goal (SDG) #6: water and sanitation for all by 2030. Unfortunately, according to the UN, this is a goal that we are collectively far behind on.

Global Water Sanitation

The hard reality is that the availability of freshwater is becoming increasingly scarce in many parts of the world. According to the United Nations, over 2 billion people lack access to safe drinking water, and by 2025, half of the world’s population could be living in water-stressed areas. This makes World Water Day an important opportunity to focus attention on the urgent need to protect and conserve our freshwater resources.

While it is important for us to continue putting pressure on our world leaders to take steps towards creating a world with clean water for everyone, we must also focus on the small day-to-day tasks that we can do to promote the practice of ensuring clean water and sanitation for all.

 This checklist was created in conjunction with the Water Action Plan as easy to implement to-dos for people across the world. You can see how others are taking more direct action on their Be the Change site here.

 

How about here at home?

Yolo County and Central California are both heavily reliant on water for agriculture, with the Central Valley being one of the most productive agricultural regions in the world. However, our region is also facing significant challenges related to water scarcity and water quality. Groundwater overdraft, recent droughts, and contamination from agricultural runoff are just some of the issues that are affecting our region’s water resources.

An immediate way that the Co-op can help combat these issues is by the continued sourcing of products from local, organic and sustainable producers, which can help to support more responsible water use and quality practices. However, by understanding the impacts of water use in agriculture and other sectors nearby, we can all can make more informed choices and help to promote sustainable water management practices in our communities. We can also support advocacy efforts aimed at protecting and conserving freshwater resources locally and beyond.

While recent rainfall to start 2023 feels promising in alleviating some of the drought-related stress surrounding our water supply, it is important to continue water conservation efforts and stay up-to-date with information on the state of our water directly from Yolo County.

The importance of clean water and the issues surrounding its access cannot be overstated and are far from covered comprehensively in this short blog. For more information, we encourage you to visit the UN’s dedicated page to World Water Day here    

More >>

Black Vegan Chefs and the Future of Food

Black people became the fastest growing vegan demographic in the country in 2022. It’s no wonder then that Black vegan chefs are expanding the boundaries of both Black and vegan cuisine in the US, with aims to practice a veganism that uplifts people and planet. 

Veganism as environmental justice as racial justice

Let’s explore some of the reasons why Black folks and Black chefs are turning to veganism. 

But first, let’s talk about intersectionality. Intersectionality is a relatively new concept in Western thought and describes “the ways in which systems of inequality based on gender, race, ethnicity, sexual orientation, gender identity, disability, class and other forms of discrimination ‘intersect’ to create unique dynamics and effects.” 

For example, Black Americans are more likely to live in food deserts than white Americans. Is race the sole determining factor? Most certainly not. We know that food deserts are also more likely in communities with small populations, lower incomes, low levels of education, and higher rates of unemployment. Using the intersectional approach, we can see then that race, socio-economic status, education level, and other dimensions of identity overlap here to create and sustain a system in which certain folks seriously lack access to healthy, fresh, and affordable foods.

Southern Style BBQ Tofu by Brandi Crawford

So, veganism, environmental justice and racial justice…intersect? Yes they do! Let’s look at exactly how. Take one common reason for going vegan: reducing cruelty and harm to animals. You’ve done away with meat, dairy, eggs, honey, cheese and you’re filling your shopping cart with so many vegetables. Before you check out, consider: Was the Latinx farmworker who harvested your food paid a fair wage? Do they work in safe conditions? Does the farmer own the DNA inside the seeds they plant or does a chemical company? Were the fields sprayed with pesticides that will end up in our rivers and oceans? If you don’t know, can you really say your veganism reduces cruelty? 

While there are many individual health benefits to eating more plants, going vegan is also an opportunity to engage more deeply with the social, political and environmental sides of what we eat. For the Black community, which is disproportionately affected by climate change and health conditions associated with racism, many see veganism as an opportunity to fight against these inequalities.

We should also mention that communities in Asia, Latin America, and Africa have been “eating vegan” – plant-based – for thousands of years. Trendy vegan foods like quinoa and sweet potatoes made popular by wealthy, white social media influencers have been staple crops for millions across recorded time. In fact, these days non-white Americans are more likely to be vegetarian or vegan than white Americans. 

Okay, now let’s meet some of the Black vegan chefs changing the game.

Tracye McQuirter

@byanygreens

Tracye McQuirter earned her Masters in Public Health from NYU and has over 36 years of experience eating and cooking vegan. She directed the first federally funded, community-based vegan nutrition program; co-created the first vegan-themed website specifically for Black Americans; launched the first Black American vegan starter guide; wrote two vegan how-to/recipe books; and previously served as a nutrition advisor for Black Women’s Health Imperative. Purchase her cookbooks and guides here

Aisha “Pinky” Cole

@sluttyveganATL

Aisha Cole is the brilliance behind Atlanta’s Slutty Vegan restaurant which regularly attracts an hour-long line of folks dreaming of her incredible vegan burgers at accessible prices. She opened the first Slutty Vegan in the majority Black neighborhood of West End, where there were previously zero plant based options. When Cole isn’t running multiple locations throughout Georgia or hosting Slutty Vegan pop-ups around the country, she’s donating funds to help local college students pay off their debts and stay in school. 

Bryant Terry

@bryantterry

Yes, Bryant Terry is a big deal. He’s won a James Beard Award and Fast Company named him one of 9 People Who Are Changing the Future of Food. He has also worked as Chef-in-Residence at San Francisco’s Museum of African Diaspora, authored best-selling cookbooks, and founded 4 Color Books, an imprint creating visually stunning books with BIPOC chefs and writers. In other words, he’s a fierce food justice advocate. 

If you want to learn how Black folks have always been major influencers and innovators on the American food system, check out our blog on Black food history.

More >>

2023: International Year of the Millets

The United Nations declared 2023 the International Year of Millets, which got us pretty excited about this little grain. There are a number of reasons why the United Nations is shining a spotlight on this little-known nutri-cereal including millets’ suitability for cultivation under adverse and changing climate conditions.

 

Wait, what is millet?

Millets are a group of grains referred to as “nutri-cereals” because of their high nutrition content compared to more common cereal grains like wheat, rice and corn. Millets are a genetically diverse group including pearl, proso, foxtail, barnyard, little, kodo, browntop, finger and Guinea millets as well as fonio, sorghum (or great millet) and teff. Millets were some of the first plants to be domesticated and serve as a staple crop for millions of people in Sub-Saharan Africa and Asia to this day. These grains can grow in poor soil with few inputs, are resistant to many crop diseases and pests, and can survive harsh climatic conditions. So far, everything is coming up millets!

Millet is a nutritional powerhouse

  • Gluten free
  • Low Glycemic Index
  • Good source of fiber and protein
  • Excellent source of Vitamin A, Vitamin B, phosphorus, potassium, antioxidants, niacin, calcium and iron

More Reasons to Love Millets

  • Adaptable to different production environments, without high fertilizer or pesticide needs
  • Deeply tied to ancestral traditions, cultures and Indigenous knowledge
  • Good for animal health as feed
  • Diverse in taste and applications in the kitchen (recipes follow)
  • Quick cooking time
  • A source of income for marginal production areas in rural, urban, regional and
    international trade

You can read more about the International Year of the Millets here.

Find millet products including whole grain millet and millet flour on Co-op shelves year round! Not sure what to do with it? You can swap it out for rice or quinoa in most recipes. I like to toast it and add it to granola, chocolate chip cookies and other baked goods. Check out some of our favorite recipes below.

Perfect Stovetop Millet

  • 1 cup whole grain millet
  • 2 cups water
  • ½ teaspoon salt

Rinse millet under cold running water for about 30 seconds. Add to a pot with 2 cups water and salt. Bring to a boil, then reduce heat to low, cover, and cook for 15 minutes. Remove from the heat but DO NOT remove the lid. Set a time for 10 more minutes for the millet to steam. When the timer goes off, remove lid and fluff with a fork.  

Vegan Millet Pancakes

  • 1 cup millet flour
  • 1 tablespoon baking powder
  • ¼ teaspoon ground cinnamon
  • ½ teaspoon salt 
  • 3 very ripe bananas, mashed
  • ½ cup nondairy milk
  • 1 teaspoon vanilla extract 
  • vegan butter
  • For serving: maple syrup, fresh or stewed berries, peanut butter, toasted coconut, banana slices, etc. 

Combine millet flour, baking powder, cinnamon and salt in a bowl. Mix well. In a separate bowl, combine mashed bananas, milk and vanilla. Add the dry to the wet and whisk until no lumps remain. 

Heat vegan butter in a skillet over medium heat. Once hot, spoon about 1/4 cup of batter into the pan. You can do more than one at a time, but don’t crowd the pan. Reduce heat and cook until you see bubbles coming to the pancake’s surface and the bottom is golden brown, about 3-4 minutes. Flip and cook another 2-4 minutes. Keep pancakes warm in a 180 degree F oven until ready to serve then top with your favorite things! 

Maple Pecan Breakfast Bowl

  • 1 cup cooked millet
  • roasted pumpkin or squash
  • maple pecans*
  • ground flaxseeds
  • pumpkin seeds
  • hemp seeds 
  • ground cinnamon
  • maple syrup
  • ½ cup warmed milk of choice

*To make maple pecans preheat oven to 350 degrees F. Toss raw pecans with a little maple syrup, vanilla extract and a pinch of salt. Spread on a parchment-lined baking sheet and bake for 8-10 minutes. Cool at room temperature before eating or using in a recipe. Store at room temperature for up to 5 days in an airtight container. 

Heat milk over low heat until steaming (hot but not boiling). Add cooked millet to a bowl. Top with roasted pumpkin, maple pecans, seeds, a sprinkle of cinnamon and a drizzle of maple syrup. Finish by pouring warmed milk over everything. 

Spiced Millet and Dried Apricot Salad

Salad

  • ½ cup uncooked millet (or 2 cups cooked millet)
  • 1 large carrot, grated
  • 2 spring onions, thinly sliced
  • ¼ cup chopped almonds, toasted
  • ¼ cup pistachios, chopped
  • 6 dried apricots, chopped into small pieces
  • ¼ cup Italian parsley, chopped

Dressing

  • 3 tablespoons walnut oil (or EVOO)
  • 1 tablespoon apple cider vinegar
  • 1 teaspoon pomegranate molasses (or balsamic vinegar)
  • 1 teaspoon ras el hanout seasoning blend 
  • ¼ teaspoon maple syrup
  • ¼ teaspoon salt or to taste
  • a grind of black pepper
  • 2 teaspoons fresh lemon juice

Rinse millet in a strainer until the water runs clear.  Add to a small pan with 1 cup of clean water and a pinch of salt, put the lid on, bring to the boil and turn the heat right down to low. Leave the millet simmering for 10-15 minutes until cooked. Remove from the heat but do not remove the lid. Set a time for 10 more minutes for the millet to steam. When the timer goes off, remove lid and fluff with a fork.  Cool at room temperature for about an hour or in the fridge for 20 minutes. 

 

Mix the cooled millet with the rest of the salad ingredients in a large salad bowl. Combine dressing ingredients in a mason jar with a well-fitting lid or in a small bowl. Shake or whisk until combined. Pour over the salad and toss. Allow to sit at room temp for 20 minutes before serving as this will allow flavors to really come together. 

Sweet Potato and Millet Falafel

  • 1 cup cooked chickpeas
  • 1 cup cooked sweet potato, mashed*
  • ½ cup red onion, chopped
  • 2 cloves garlic
  • ¼ cup flat leaf parsley, chopped
  • ¼ cup cilantro, chopped
  • 1 teaspoon ground coriander
  • 1 teaspoon salt plus more for sprinkling
  • ½ teaspoon ground cumin
  • ¼ teaspoon cayenne
  • ¼ teaspoon ground black pepper
  • 1 cup cooked millet, at room temperature
  • Avocado or grapeseed oil for frying

*Preheat oven to 425 degrees F and line a baking sheet with parchment. Cube 1 medium sweet potato (no need to peel – lots of nutrients in the skin) and toss with 1 teaspoon of olive oil and generous pinches of salt and pepper. Bake for 15 minutes, flip, and return to the oven for 10-15 minutes. Cool slightly then mash with a fork.

Place the chickpeas, sweet potato, onion, garlic, parsley, cilantro, coriander, salt, cumin, cayenne, and black pepper into the bowl of a food processor and pulse, stopping to scrape down the sides of the bowl occasionally, until all of the ingredients are uniform in size, but still slightly grainy in texture. Transfer the mixture to a mixing bowl and fold in the cooked millet. Roll 2-3 tablespoons of the falafel mixture into a small patty with your hands. Repeat with the rest of the falafel mixture placing the uncooked falafel on a large plate or baking sheet until ready to cook.

Heat a large skillet over medium-high heat. Pour 2-3 tablespoons of frying oil in the skillet and swirl to coat. Place the patties in the skillet and cook for 2-3 minutes on each side, until crispy and brown. Transfer to a paper towel-lined plate to absorb the excess oil and sprinkle with salt.

More >>

Fairtrade Farmers are More Resilient

A 2022 study finds fair trade farmers experience increased economic resilience, social wellbeing, environmental sustainability and governance of their cooperatives, particularly in times of global crisis.

The Fairtrade System uses 2 price mechanisms, the minimum price and the premium, to ensure farmers earn a reliable and, well, fair income. These price mechanisms represent a safety net not only for the farmers who grow the food, but for their co-ops and communities more broadly. From 2012 to 2022 Fairtrade farmers experienced increased earnings, the ability to withstand periods of financial instability and boosted savings. In the case of Fairtrade certified La Florida cooperative in Peru, farmers reported incomes 50% higher than those of non-Fairtrade farmers. 

The study also found Fairtrade cooperatives enjoy

  • stronger governance

  • greater transparency

  • more democratic decision-making

  • increased gender equality

  • improved workplace health and safety

80% of the world’s food comes from 608 million family farms, with one third of those farming less than 5 acres of land. Not surpisingly, the overlapping global crises of recent years have hit smallholder farms in Global South countries the hardest. With pressure from consumers to keep prices low in the United States, costs are often passed back to small farmers and the land itself. Renato Alvarado, Minister of Agriculture and Livestock in Costa Rica, explains, “producers bear the production costs on our shoulders and the profits remain in the hands of others.” 

Carmen is a member of the CONACADO cooperative, and by joining the Fairtrade certified co-op, she has been able to tap into their collective bargaining power when it comes to pricing. Through the co-op, she has secured a better price for her cocoa making it possible to achieve her goals of scaling production and diversifying her crops. And for Carmen, cocoa isn’t just about her own business. It’s about the community working and thriving together. Shoppers in the US are directly participating in this community by purchasing products made with ingredients from Fairtrade certified farms like Carmen’s.

The findings of this study underscore our continued commitment to carrying and promoting as many fair trade products as possible at the Co-op. Purchasing fair trade products at the Davis Food Co-op not only helps support our store and local economy, but ensures that we are also being good global stewards by supporting the fair treatment of small farmers and producers worldwide.

More >>

Gift Ideas Under $10, $20 & $50

Find gifts for everyone on your list at the Co-op! Check out our ideas for budget-friendly gifting or go for a sure thing: a Co-op gift card! You can purchase in store or online here

Under $10

Salt Crystal Tea Light Holder $6.49

Aside from glowing in stunning sunset hues, salt lamps release negatine ions into the air which studies show may help lessen anxiety and stress. 

Aura Cacia Aromatherapy Foam Bath 2/$5 thru 12/13 (reg. $3.99 ea) 

Scrunchies $4.99

Instant Plant Food $8.99 for 2 tablets

The perfect gift for plant parents, green thumb not necessary.

Rishi Teas $8.99

Delicious? Check. Beautiful packaging? Check! Tea is a great gift to pair with a mug or insulated tumbler. To keep costs down, choose a tea on sale!

Assorted Enamel Pins $9.99 and Assorted Stickers $3.99

Mini Calendars $7.99

Pocket Sized Decomposition Book $5.99

Under $20

House Plants $17.99+

We have a good variety of house plants in the store, including easy to grow ZZ plants and succulents and this stunning rattlesnake calathea. 

Maggie’s Organic Socks $9.99+

Maggie’s Organic Socks are the BEST. And there’s something for everyone: urban hiker socks, mountain hiker socks, hand-dyed rainbow socks, extra thick cozy socks, etc. 

Aura Cacia Essential Oil Kits $12.49 thru 12/13 (reg. $19.99)

Pachamama Coffee Beans $15.99

Bonus: Pachamama’s new packaging is compostable! 

Assorted Books $15.99+

Fat and the Moon Bath Soak $18.99

Herbalist crafted, small batch skincare made in Grass Valley, CA. 

Assorted Puzzles $18.99

We have tons of puzzles from 400 to 1000 pieces. 

Truffle Honey $14.99

For the gourmand in your life~

Silicone Baking Mat $13.99

This is perfect for the person on your list who loves to bake or for the person trying to go zero-waste. 

Felted Wool Animal Kits $19.99

For the crafty person in your life. Or for the person who wants to get crafty – these kits are pretty easy to do! We have a variety of animals to choose from.

Assorted Calendars $14.99

Under $50

Teaching Kitchen Cooking Class $30-45

Gift someone on your list a cooking classes from the Davis Food Co-op. Our classes are highly rated and often sell out weeks in advance. Get info and buy tickets here!

Crystal Witch Earrings $39.99

Made by local artist and Co-op Owner Jen of Davis, CA. 

Essential Oil Diffuser $33.99

Get this for the person on your list who loves making their home/space luxurious and cozy or for someone who works from home to make their space better. If you have the budget, get an essential oil to go with the diffuser. Peppermint is a festive pick! 

Fair Trade Headband $23.99

Gift warmth and cuteness with these fairly traded headbands. 

Slippers $29.99

Faux-sherpa lined for coziness with hard soles for indoor and outdoor wear! 

Prickly Pear Body Whip $27.99

Made locally with ethically sourced ingredients!

More >>